The Truth About Counteroffers

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I’ll start with the punch line:  

Why would your current employer offer you an inducement to stay after you’ve announced your intention to leave?  HINT:  It’s for THEIR reasons, it’s not for YOURS.

Choosing to leave an employer is a big decision. Once you’ve taken an outside offer and have prepared to give notice, you’ve already carefully evaluated the current situation and the new one and have made a thoughtful decision. Despite the fact that we all work for a paycheck, money is typically not the primary motivating factor in deciding to leave. Here is the question:  Why then, would you choose to stay for any reason other than the one that prompted you to leave in the first place?  Counteroffers are more common in today’s tight labor market. Does the market change the way we should respond?

What really went through your boss’s head when you gave notice:

“Does this reflect on me?”

“Boy, this is bad timing!”

“Maybe I can get him/her to stay at least until I find someone to fill the role!”

“How am I going to get this work done and look for a replacement?”

After 22 years in the recruiting industry, I’ve witnessed that more than 90% of candidates who’ve accepted counteroffers have regretted it.  Either they leave anyway or are terminated within six months to a year.  Your reasons for choosing to leave in the first place almost always still exist.  If your company had to be forced to pay you more or offer you a suddenly bright new future based on a threat to leave, is this the relationship you value in the first place? Can they get past the lack of loyalty they now perceive?

When presented with an outside offer, consider the entire picture.  Make sure that you only accept an offer that places you in a better situation for the long term.  Let your employer know that you will be leaving, protect the relationship (avoid burning bridges), then stick to the thoughtful decision you’ve made.

Written by: Julie Godshall Brown

 

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How to Help Newly Hired Employees Hit the Ground Running!

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You’ve put an incredible amount of effort into hiring the right match for your position, your offer was accepted, and now you’re anxious to see the results.  Your work is done, right?  Not quite!  A few easy tips for helping your newly hired employee get off to the right start:

  1. Give them a warm welcome! Whether or not you provide a formal orientation, introduce them around so that coworkers will know who they are and where they are working. Allow some time for interaction via the water cooler or a personal introduction.  Give them information about customs that may be unique to your firm.  Have someone invite them to lunch the first day if possible.
  2. Make sure the newly hired employee feels you are ready for them. Are business cards in? Is the computer set up? Do they have office supplies?  Little things matter.
  3. Be wise in choosing the trainer. Like most small businesses, if you don’t have a formal training program, be cautious not to assume that the employee with the most expertise is also the best trainer. Often, you will want to involve multiple people in the process so that the newly hired employee understands how their role fits into the organization.  For example, sales professionals should spend time with customer service or technical support professionals so that they understand the customer.  Also, be aware that people have different learning styles—some need to “do” rather than just hear or see.
  4. Set clear expectations. This is your chance to start with a clean slate.  Let the new hire know what is expected of them and how they will be measured.  Let them know how often you will meet with them and how to have questions answered.
  5. Put their success in the hands of the entire team. When the team feels it is in their best interest for a newly hired employee to be successful, they are more likely to support them and give the newly hired employee the best possible chance for success.

 

Written by: Julie Godshall Brown

Julie is the president and owner of Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing. She has been with her family business full time since 1995 and remained as president and owner when her parents retired in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Clemson University and a Master of Personnel and Employee Relations from the University of South Carolina. In addition to leading her firm and several industry related organizations, she is a very active community volunteer who has made an impact on the future of the Upstate.

How to Market Yourself for a Job When You are Overqualified

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Here’s the scenario: You see an interesting job posting online. You think to yourself, “I have this experience, and I could be great in this role.” You’re considering applying for the position, but then you pause and reflect, “Wait, what will they think? I did this two steps back in my career. I’m overqualified!”

Believe it or not, this is a common dilemma for many job seekers. Talented individuals go through many stages in their careers, and at times, they find value in taking one or multiple steps back. People consider this scenario for a variety of reasons. This post is not designed to answer the question why, but instead to provide direction on the question: how does someone who’s overqualified garner strong consideration from hiring managers?

 

First, it’s important to understand why a company would shy away from overqualified candidates. There are many potential reasons, but I’ve listed a few commons thoughts below.

  • The person is too far removed from doing the hands on work required for the role.
  • This is a temporary step back for the person applying and as soon as an opportunity at their level emerges, they will leave.
  • There’s no way this person would be willing to take direction to do a job they used to supervise. They’ll feel the role is beneath them.
  • They won’t be willing to learn how to do the job “our way” because they’ll insist that their process is superior.

These are just examples of thoughts going through a hiring manager’s head. None of these assumptions may apply to you, but they exist nonetheless. Your goal should be to justify your motivation and interest in the role and, to the best of your ability, persuade them that you are the best person for the job.

 

A few things that may help you in your mission:

  • Instead of a traditional resume format, consider one that bullets your skills. You’ll want to list your places of previous employment as well as titles, of course, but lead with your skills. Focus primarily on the skills that the job posting requires and how you succeeded in those areas.
  • In your bullet points, be sure to highlight your unique accomplishments and provide some quantifiable details related to those accomplishments. Example: As an accounts receivable clerk with ABC Company, I successfully reduced our 90 day accounts by 80% within a 6-month period bringing over 75 customers into current status.
  • Use your objective to communicate a viable message to the company as to why you are looking to make this change in your career and why it would benefit them to consider you. Be brief but honest. Do your best to dispel their concerns about your motivation.
  • Utilize your network. There is nothing more powerful than a referral. Think about how many times you’ve asked friends, family, and co-workers to recommend a store, service, product, etc. People like helping other people. If you know someone associated with the company you’re applying to, ask them to put in a good word for you. You can deliver a message in a resume all day long, but having a neutral party speak on your behalf can speak volumes.

In summary, being overqualified does not mean you are not the perfect fit for the role. What it may mean is that you need to take additional steps to help that hiring manager understand why they would be doing themselves a disservice to not call you.

Written by: John Riddle

John joined the Godshall team, having previously spent 9 years in sales and management as well as 4 years in recruiting. After earning his Bachelor of Business Administration from James Madison University, John spent the last 13 years working and living in Washington, D.C. He most recently managed a recruiting team in the D.C. office for SPARKS primarily supporting HR and administrative roles. John is a member of the professional team at Godshall and recruits for administrative, accounting, legal, Banking, and HR.  A recent transplant to Greenville, John moved here with his wife and two sons. His wife, Laura, is a native of Greenville and Wofford College graduate.

 

How to Land a Great Position in The Technical and Engineering Field

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As you may already know, this is an engineering and technology driven society, more so than any time before. With that said, it is still a highly competitive market for engineers and technical professionals. As a job seeker in this economy, how do you differentiate yourself from other possible candidates when searching for a job?

  1. You must put in the effort and time to research and know the hottest markets and trends (in your geographical area(s) of preference) with regards to your area of expertise. Know which companies are hiring candidates with your similar education, technical skill set and credentials.
  2. Make sure to add the keywords to your resume and cover letter that will accentuate, detail and add the appropriate experience that you have relative the targeted ‘hot markets’. Needless to say, do not embellish these details and make sure to document what, when and where you had this experience/training. Also, be certain to detail your specific professional accomplishments.
  3. Maximize your networking efforts, utilizing personal and professional contacts, professional societies/groups and social media such as LinkedIn. Never stop seeking out new contacts and connections. Often, you are one click away from discovering the perfect career option or meeting the right person to introduce you to your ideal career position and employer.
  4. Once you have zeroed in on your targeted potential employers, make certain you have researched everything that you can about the company including their products, culture, history and trends. This will help you target your cover letter, introduction and resume. It will also help prepare and increase your comfort level for the next important step, the interview process.

Written by: Richard Heard Richard_Heard

Richard Heard has been a technical recruiter with Godshall since 1991. He specializes in manufacturing management, engineering and technical placements. Richard is ASA certified as a Technical Services Professional and a Certified Staffing Professional. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Management and Marketing from the University of South Carolina. In his free time, Richard loves spending his time with his wonderful children, new granddaughter and family. He is an avid fisherman with an emphasis on freshwater trout and redfish.