Start Off With Success!

Start Off With Success!

meeting

Does your firm provide fertile soil in which your newly hired talent can flourish?  I recently read an article in which the author and researcher raised the question of whether top talent is “portable”, and the individual would succeed in any environment.  Interestingly, even top performers in seemingly individual roles (i.e., financial broker) were often not as successful after a move to a new firm if that new firm did not have a process providing support during the transition and a support structure that encouraged success long-term.  It may sound cliché, but we should ask ourselves, “What can we do today to improve our onboarding process for new hires supporting our employees, allowing them to reach their highest possible level of performance?” 

Dare we let our best assets, top talent, wilt on the vine?

Below are some easy tips to help support your newly hired talent start off with success!

  1. Details matter. Do your best to have the workspace ready (computer, phone, pens, note paper) and business cards ordered prior to the start date.  It can take some time for a new employee to feel at home, but an employer who makes a place for someone sends the message that they care.
  2. Communication! Share any information on paperwork they will need to bring their first day, an agenda of what they can expect that day, any parking information, and a quick summary of the company’s dress code so they don’t feel out of place.
  3. Let your current employees know! Email your team letting them know the name of who is starting, what their title is, their work experience/education, and your hopes for what this new person will bring to the company!
  4. Give them a warm welcome!It doesn’t take much to make a new employee feel welcome. A quick coffee social or donuts in the breakroom goes a long way. You can also have someone from the company take them out to lunch the first day. This allows them to start feeling like they know someone a little better at the company.
  5. Give a tour of the office. Share information such as locations of bathrooms, kitchen/breakrooms, conference rooms, etc. Explain different departments, where HR is located, and any other essentials.
  6. Be wise in choosing the trainer.Like most small businesses, if you don’t have a formal training program, be cautious not to assume that the employee with the most expertise is also the best trainer. Often, you will want to involve multiple people in the process so that the newly hired employee understands how their role fits into the organization.  For example, sales professionals should spend time with customer service or technical support professionals so that they understand the customer.  Also, be aware that people have different learning styles—some need to “do” rather than just hear or see.
  7. Set clear expectations.This is your chance to start with a clean slate.  Review the new employee’s job description letting them know what is expected of them and how they will be measured.  Let them know how often you will meet with them and how to have questions answered.
  8. Ask what their expectations are. It’s just as important to make sure you are meeting their expectations too. For example, the new employee might be used to meeting monthly vs. quarterly. Adjusting to monthly could help them perform better and feel more valued by your company. This would also be the time to communicate any discrepancies if their expectations don’t meet yours. It’s better to try and resolve any issues now versus 6 months from now.
  9. Schedule software trainings and any other necessary formal trainings as soon as possible. It’s important to make sure your new employee knows all software, processes and best practices as soon as possible.
  10. Schedule social outings. The more time your new employee can hangout with your team, the better. Whether they’re going to sing karaoke, play some good ole fashion bingo, or hit some balls at Top Golf, they will get to know each other in a more relaxed setting and make them feel more comfortable.
  11. Put their success in the hands of the entire team.When the team feels it is in their best interest for a newly hired employee to be successful, they are more likely to support them and give the newly hired employee the best possible chance for success.

Do you have any other tips for starting new employees off with success?

Written by: Julie Godshall Brown and Shawn Kinard

 

 

🎄It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like I Need a New Job!🎄

frustrated

Contemplating a new job can leave you anxious and disheartened. It’s not something I think any of us are excited to do. It’s time consuming and a little intimidating; however, it is sometimes a must. If you’re wondering whether you’re in that boat or not, here are some key signs you need to start updating that resume:

  1. You’re getting passed over for promotions by less qualified peers. Now if you’re that millennial thinking you need to be promoted to manager after only being there for 6 months, slow your roll. I’m talking about promotions that you are qualified for and deserving of. If you’ve asked to be considered for promotions that you know are a logical progression of your skills and abilities but they keep passing over you, it might be time to start looking elsewhere. Especially if they never give you a true reason as to why they won’t consider you. A healthy and blossoming work environment will see your value, your hard work, and find joy in promoting you to a well-deserved role.
  2. You haven’t been given a raise or merit increase in over 18 months. This kind of falls into  the same philosophy as above. Many companies give at least a 3% raise annually to match inflation and honor your loyalty. Managers can see the hard work you’re making for the company. If you’re not receiving at least a cost of living increase, you need to start questioning whether you are part of a company that will allow you to grow professionally and financially. A healthy work environment and management team will recognize your hard work and want to reward you for it.
  3. Your company is hanging by a thread. One of the reasons you might not be receiving those annual increases could be because the company can’t afford it! If you’re being called by your vendors continuously for unpaid invoices, that’s a bad sign.
  4. Turnover is high. Do you have a new co-worker every 6 months? Is your manager doing anything to stop the bleeding? Unfortunately, high turnover is a reflection on company’s management and it’s not a pretty one. If this is the case where you work, it’s time to start looking.
  5. You notice the company is downsizing. Downsizing can happen for numerous reasons in a company: poor economic conditions, cost reduction, consolidation, outsourcing, etc. This doesn’t necessarily mean you are going to be included in layoffs, but it’s definitely a good idea to start updating your resume just in case.
  6. You’re being asked to do unethical tasks. This one is an obvious sign. You never want to be asked to do things that go against your moral values or put you in risk of breaking the law.
  7. You’re thinking about your lunch break before you even go into work. Do you dread Sunday nights and look forward to Friday at 5 every single week? As a millennial myself, I feel like I must call out my peers and mention it does take a while to find what you’re passionate about  and what you truly enjoy in life. Your first job out of college is not going to be your dream job. And you might not enjoy every second of every day you’re at work. That’s just a part of life.  That being said, if you’ve been at your company for at least a year and you dread work every single day, it’s time to turn on those alerts on the job boards.

Looking for a new job can be frightening, but sometimes necessary for the well-being of you and your career. If you have any other signs I didn’t mention, share them below! 

Shawn 2016 croppedWritten by: Shawn Kinard

Shawn is the Recruiting and Branding Specialist at Godshall. She has been at Godshall for over 5 years now. She graduated from Anderson University with a Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management. She enjoys biking on the Swamp Rabbit Trail, hot yoga, and trying new recipes when she’s not in the office.

How to Land Your First Job in Healthcare and Keep It

Congratulations! You’ve landed your first healthcare job. You feel like a rock star. You’ve got the skills, personality and professionalism that your employer wanted, but any savvy employee knows that landing the job is only the beginning. Now you have to keep the job! A few tips to ensure success:

1.      Your Office Hours Are Not 8:07am-­4:59pm

 Be on time. It sounds so simple, yet everyday good employees get terminated for this very infraction. How embarrassing to lose your shiny new job because you are consistently five minutes late! It doesn’t matter that you work late to make it up. It is your responsibility to be on time, and once you’ve lost a job for tardiness, it makes you less desirable to be hired again.

2.      Gold Stars

 Show initiative! Employers love this. If you finish your work early, ask for more to do. You’ll look like the superstar you are. Pitching in where needed is in everyone’s job description.

3.       Have I Told You About the Time…

 You were smart and kept the personal information to a minimum in the interview. Now that you’ve got the job, the same rules apply and even more so. Stay away from office drama.  You are there to work and work only.

4.      Can You Help Me With My Boxes?

 Don’t move in. A photo, nice pens and a plant are fine if you have a desk or work area, but don’t bring everything from your home into your work area.

5.      Mom, Can We Have Pizza for Dinner?

 Keep your cell phone off and personal calls to a minimum. If your cell phone must be on for emergencies, have it on vibrate or silent mode and return calls only on breaks or at lunch. Train your friends and family to know that calling you during work hours is only for emergencies. Texting is also a growing concern in business settings. Texting while driving can wreck your car, and texting while working can wreck your job.

 6.      Training Day

 Many new employees complain that they get limited training when they begin a job. Unfortunately, in today’s fast paced medical offices this is quite possibly true. Take notes, ask smart questions and ask for feedback early on. If your manager doesn’t officially match you up with a seasoned employee as a mentor, take notice of who stands out as an exemplary employee and model their behavior. You can learn an enormous amount of valuable information in the first two weeks of a new job just by keeping quiet and observing.

7.       Big Brother is Watching

 No internet surfing—checking emails, Facebook, shopping sites and job boards are not for work hours, and many employers can easily track your every move on the computer. Do  you really want to tell your next employer that you were terminated in your last job because you were updating your status on Facebook?

It is a competitive market right now. Hiring officials want the best possible clinical and clerical staff for their medical offices. With these easy tips, you are well on your way to landing the healthcare job of your dreams and keeping it!

Written by: Karen Truesdale

Karen TruesdaleKaren Truesdale is celebrating her 12th year with Godshall this summer. She manages the support operations for the office as well as all the medical credentialing for Godshall’s healthcare employees. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Wofford College and a Master of Elementary Education from Converse College. She is an avid animal lover and movie/entertainment trivia buff.