Showing Appreciation: A Win for Managers, Employees, and Companies

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Years ago when Facebook caught on with middle-aged people like myself, it became clear to me that people deeply wanted to express their stories, feel seen, and be heard. I think that is true for employees in the workplace as well. Do I want to be paid a fair salary? Yes. Do I want to feel like my manager really sees what I provide to the company, appreciates it, and trusts me just as much? Yes.

I manage a small team. Or as a friend once said, “I look after them.” I always liked that phrasing because that is exactly true. I do look after them. Below are the top 10 ways I try to make my team feel appreciated:

  • Make yourself available: If a team member asks to speak with me outside of our regularly scheduled catch up, I drop what I’m doing to make time for them. To me, nothing is more important than letting each member know that they are important to me and the company.
  • Coach them on the areas they can improve upon: I let my team know that theirsuccess is my success and a success for the company. I am there to help each team member achieve their goals and get better. Be specific, keep it to the facts, and be fair.
  • Have their backs: A former co-worker once told me that she always boosted up her team to the president in meetings and then later went back and communicated to her team what needed to be corrected. I have never forgotten that. I take responsibility for any shortcomings and begin coaching my team up.
  • Take a personal interest in their lives: I have tried to get to know each person that reports to me as a person. I once listened in on webinar where the speaker said that if employees like their managers, there is nothing that they won’t do for them, and I believe that. They know that I’m not asking anything of them that I wouldn’t do myself. We are all in this together.
  • Treats! As a former teacher, I love celebrating holidays and special occasions. My team gets flowers, candy, extra time away from the office, homemade sweets, a personal note, etc. It costs me very little time or money and I think it makes them feel special, and in turn, that makes me proud.
  • Be flexible with time: I try to accommodate their requests for time off. We are a small team but if they need to leave early, take lunch at an unusual time, or go to a dentist appointment that they remembered at the last minute, I try to make it happen. No one likes to ask their manager if they can do something outside of the norm. If you always do your best to accommodate, on the off times when you can’t, they will know that you’ve done what you can.
  • Listen: Sometimes employees just need to vent, blow of some steam, cry, or have a meltdown to get their emotions out. Sometimes you just have to listen.
  • Ask them what they need from you and ask for their ideas: What do they need from me to be successful? Do I need to run interference on something, move a task to someone else’s plate temporarily, or be a sounding board? Not everyone feels comfortable giving their opinions freely, so I make a point to see if someone from my team has a fresh set of eyes on something or a new perspective.
  • Let them manage a project that they enjoy: Our social media campaigns are important, but they were never something that I enjoyed doing on a daily basis. It was more of an after-thought for me after getting everything else on my plate finished. My millennial team member really enjoys creating content and making our postings look nice so I moved that over to her. Win, win.
  • Trust them: Assign a project, check in with them on their core responsibilities, be a sounding board, but in the end, let your direct reports know that you trust them to get the job done.

There’s a saying that employees don’t leave companies–they leave managers. It is 100% easier keeping a good employee happy than searching to refill a position, identifying the new employee, and training them to get them up to speed. It just is. I firmly believe that if you pay employees a fair salary, see, hear, and trust them, that you will have the beginnings of a satisfied and engaged team of professionals.

Writte by: Karen Truesdale

Karen is celebrating her 13th anniversary with Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing this week.  Away from the office, she enjoys spending time with her pets and her husband Matthew who is her LinkedIn editor.

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Managing Millennials & Moving On

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We’re inundated on a daily basis with content on millennials – a pervasive, complex, and reviled group of workers. So, I’ve been brainstorming about a key takeaway and what I could possibly say at this point that’s novel. I landed on a simple call to action: move on.

Here’s the deal: with the oldest millennials being about 36 years old, we finally have some definitive research on their workplace behaviors and can compare them to previous generations. Here’s the summary: there is little to no difference in levels of narcissism, job tenure, or work ethic amongst millennials and previous generations in their twenties. It turns out, all youth is narcissistic, indecisive, and distracted.

Okay, okay. You need evidence. After all, I’m a millennial – why trust me?

Most of the studies you see compare millennials to the current feelings and behaviors of Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers. A study cited in Business Insider just this week provides a perfect example. “Daymon Worldwide notes that millennials are more obsessed with being unique and standing out than their parents and grandparents are.” (http://www.businessinsider.com/differences-between-boomers-gen-x-and-millennials-2016-6) I hope they didn’t spend a lot of money on that research because if I compare any 25 year old and their 75 year old Nana, I would certainly hope their level of maturity and narcissism differed.

In regards to the job-hopping, Baby Boomer’s actually changed jobs in their twenties at the same rate that millennials do now (http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/nlsoy.pdf)! Let me demystify this: young people usually take whatever job they can get starting off. They don’t know what they want to do long-term and millennials came of age during a recession where if you didn’t take whatever job you could get, you were perpetually unemployed. (Unemployed = no brunch. Millennials love brunch).

Lastly, millennials work differently but they are not aggregately lazy. Lazy is a really loaded word and I don’t have the space to enumerate the dangers of characterizing an entire group as something derogatory, so use your own intuition here. Every time you’re tempted to say “lazy”, replace it with “different.” Because the truth is millennials are very different from previous generations in their beliefs about work. We don’t always subscribe to traditional hours. We value work-life balance and sometimes prioritize it over a demanding career. We want to understand the why’s behind what we’re doing because we need purpose. Are these good qualities? Bad? Admirable? I don’t know exactly, but aren’t all those statements what people tell us to prioritize after it’s too late for them to change? Spend more time with your family. Do something you love. Work hard, but set boundaries.

On the upside, you’ll also find that we answer late-night emails. Because we grew up with technology, we constantly look for ways to be more efficient. When we find our passion, we’ll work however many hours it takes. The key for employers is to harness that passion and not let vintage expectations drive away a talented workforce.

So, that’s it. There’s your answer. Young people are needy and kind of difficult to work with and they always will be. Maybe in a few years I’ll be blogging on the pains of Gen Zer’s. Que sera, tale as old as time. Let’s stop dwelling it on it now.

Written by: Hannah Barfield Spellmeyer

How to Land a Great Position in The Technical and Engineering Field

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As you may already know, this is an engineering and technology driven society, more so than any time before. With that said, it is still a highly competitive market for engineers and technical professionals. As a job seeker in this economy, how do you differentiate yourself from other possible candidates when searching for a job?

  1. You must put in the effort and time to research and know the hottest markets and trends (in your geographical area(s) of preference) with regards to your area of expertise. Know which companies are hiring candidates with your similar education, technical skill set and credentials.
  2. Make sure to add the keywords to your resume and cover letter that will accentuate, detail and add the appropriate experience that you have relative the targeted ‘hot markets’. Needless to say, do not embellish these details and make sure to document what, when and where you had this experience/training. Also, be certain to detail your specific professional accomplishments.
  3. Maximize your networking efforts, utilizing personal and professional contacts, professional societies/groups and social media such as LinkedIn. Never stop seeking out new contacts and connections. Often, you are one click away from discovering the perfect career option or meeting the right person to introduce you to your ideal career position and employer.
  4. Once you have zeroed in on your targeted potential employers, make certain you have researched everything that you can about the company including their products, culture, history and trends. This will help you target your cover letter, introduction and resume. It will also help prepare and increase your comfort level for the next important step, the interview process.

Written by: Richard Heard Richard_Heard

Richard Heard has been a technical recruiter with Godshall since 1991. He specializes in manufacturing management, engineering and technical placements. Richard is ASA certified as a Technical Services Professional and a Certified Staffing Professional. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Management and Marketing from the University of South Carolina. In his free time, Richard loves spending his time with his wonderful children, new granddaughter and family. He is an avid fisherman with an emphasis on freshwater trout and redfish.

Tips To Help Your Resume Stand Out

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A good resume is critical in obtaining a new position. In today’s age of technology where so many resumes infiltrate the inbox of a hiring manager, a resume must be strong to be noticed in the competitive candidate pool. Hiring managers have limited time to focus on each resume, so use your resume as a selling tool to display your talents! Here are some tips on writing an effective resume:

  • Most hiring managers prefer resumes to be written in reverse chronological order with your most recent job first.  Beginning and ending dates should be included.  Duties of the job should be reflected underneath the job title and company. This will allow the hiring manager to see a time period for each task of the job.
  • Bullet point job duties and keep things succinct. If hiring managers have to muddle through a long narrative description of job responsibilities, they may lose interest.
  • Refrain from writing resumes in first person (for example, “I placed customer orders” or “I was promoted”).
  • Keep the verb tense the same throughout the resume. For instance, if one bullet point describes your action in the past tense, don’t change tenses in the next line. (For example, “placed customer orders” in line one does not need to be followed with “answering phones” in the next line.)
  • Make sure any awards or accomplishments are easily seen in the body of the resume.
  • Grammatical errors are the fastest way to damage the credibility of a resume. Proof your resume, run spell check and have several professionals review your resume before sending.
  • If there are valid reasons for numerous job changes, feel free to add reasons for job elimination on the resume. This is a way to convey to the hiring manager that you are not a “job hopper”.
  • It is perfectly acceptable to make your resume more than one page, especially if it takes that additional page to showcase your skills and talents.
  • Make sure the fonts and spacing are all consistent.
  • Include correct phone numbers and a professional email address on the resume to ensure easy communication.
  • Make education and/or degrees easily visible.
  • Ensure that all technical skills, including software proficiencies, are included.
  • Make sure your objective on the resume reflects the job description you are applying for. Often times, hiring managers will find an objective completely inconsistent with the job description posted.

 

Happy hunting!

Written by: Catherine Culler
Catherine Culler has been a recruiter with Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing since 2000. She specializes in recruiting and staffing for accounting, human resources, legal, administrative, financial, sales and customer service positions. Her prior background includes work in medical sales and sales training. She has three children, a son who is in seventh grade and twin daughters in sixth grade.