Start Off With Success!

Start Off With Success!

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Does your firm provide fertile soil in which your newly hired talent can flourish?  I recently read an article in which the author and researcher raised the question of whether top talent is “portable”, and the individual would succeed in any environment.  Interestingly, even top performers in seemingly individual roles (i.e., financial broker) were often not as successful after a move to a new firm if that new firm did not have a process providing support during the transition and a support structure that encouraged success long-term.  It may sound cliché, but we should ask ourselves, “What can we do today to improve our onboarding process for new hires supporting our employees, allowing them to reach their highest possible level of performance?” 

Dare we let our best assets, top talent, wilt on the vine?

Below are some easy tips to help support your newly hired talent start off with success!

  1. Details matter. Do your best to have the workspace ready (computer, phone, pens, note paper) and business cards ordered prior to the start date.  It can take some time for a new employee to feel at home, but an employer who makes a place for someone sends the message that they care.
  2. Communication! Share any information on paperwork they will need to bring their first day, an agenda of what they can expect that day, any parking information, and a quick summary of the company’s dress code so they don’t feel out of place.
  3. Let your current employees know! Email your team letting them know the name of who is starting, what their title is, their work experience/education, and your hopes for what this new person will bring to the company!
  4. Give them a warm welcome!It doesn’t take much to make a new employee feel welcome. A quick coffee social or donuts in the breakroom goes a long way. You can also have someone from the company take them out to lunch the first day. This allows them to start feeling like they know someone a little better at the company.
  5. Give a tour of the office. Share information such as locations of bathrooms, kitchen/breakrooms, conference rooms, etc. Explain different departments, where HR is located, and any other essentials.
  6. Be wise in choosing the trainer.Like most small businesses, if you don’t have a formal training program, be cautious not to assume that the employee with the most expertise is also the best trainer. Often, you will want to involve multiple people in the process so that the newly hired employee understands how their role fits into the organization.  For example, sales professionals should spend time with customer service or technical support professionals so that they understand the customer.  Also, be aware that people have different learning styles—some need to “do” rather than just hear or see.
  7. Set clear expectations.This is your chance to start with a clean slate.  Review the new employee’s job description letting them know what is expected of them and how they will be measured.  Let them know how often you will meet with them and how to have questions answered.
  8. Ask what their expectations are. It’s just as important to make sure you are meeting their expectations too. For example, the new employee might be used to meeting monthly vs. quarterly. Adjusting to monthly could help them perform better and feel more valued by your company. This would also be the time to communicate any discrepancies if their expectations don’t meet yours. It’s better to try and resolve any issues now versus 6 months from now.
  9. Schedule software trainings and any other necessary formal trainings as soon as possible. It’s important to make sure your new employee knows all software, processes and best practices as soon as possible.
  10. Schedule social outings. The more time your new employee can hangout with your team, the better. Whether they’re going to sing karaoke, play some good ole fashion bingo, or hit some balls at Top Golf, they will get to know each other in a more relaxed setting and make them feel more comfortable.
  11. Put their success in the hands of the entire team.When the team feels it is in their best interest for a newly hired employee to be successful, they are more likely to support them and give the newly hired employee the best possible chance for success.

Do you have any other tips for starting new employees off with success?

Written by: Julie Godshall Brown and Shawn Kinard

 

 

👻 BOO! Hiring Can Be Scary! 👻

Bringing someone new into your organization can be not only a time-consuming task, but a stressful and scary one too. What if they aren’t good at their job? What if they don’t get along with the other employees? What if our customers don’t like them? While I wouldn’t call Godshall a fortune teller, being in the business for 50 years has provided us the experience needed to learn the necessary steps your company should take to make the best hire possible.

  1. Define the Role Before Starting the Search – If you don’t know what you need, books2.PNGhow are you going to know what to look for? Defining the role will help you define the duties, responsibilities, and skills needed for the job. Are there any technical or software skills needed? What about soft skills? Will they be on the phone a lot and need a professional and personable attitude?
  2. Utilize Behavioral Interviewing Techniques – Behavioral questions are the best in helping you determine real-life work experiences. Have the candidate describe an actual work situation. Have them describe the situation, their role, and the result. How did they feel about their supervisors, coworkers, and subordinates during the process? Were they a hindrance or a help in solving the problem?
  3. web.PNGUnderstanding Interviewing Is Only One Step of The Screening Process – Many companies these days, including Godshall, are using skills tests, profile assessments, and other resources in their hiring process. These tests allow the hiring managers to receive insight into a candidate’s natural strengths, and help your business leaders make more informed and objective decisions on hiring.
  4. The Past Typically Predicts the Future – It sounds cliché, but reference checks are so important in the hiring process. Understanding how your potential candidate has performed in the past, where he/she was most successful, how they got along with others, and their reasons for leaving are crucial! If your candidate left for more money every year, chances are they’re going to leave you in a year for more money. Don’t be afraid to ask the references real life questions ie- How do they deal with conflict?  How do they make tough decisions?  What type of work environment do they need to succeed?  What advice would you give their new supervisor? Ask whatever you need to know (and legally allowed 😊) to help make the best hire.
  5. Consider Checking Out Social Media Profiles – Social media provides a different ghostperspective on the candidate and helps give you an idea of their character and lifestyle. Many profiles are private these days, but it doesn’t hurt to double check. LinkedIn is a great account to check out for several reasons. It allows you to make sure their history on their profile matches up with their resume. It can also give you an idea of their network especially if they are going into a high sales driven/networking role. As a hiring manager, you must be careful from what you learn on social media and what could steer your hiring decision from that. We hope all of you are non-discriminatory give consideration for employment to qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, status as a parent or protected veteran status.
  6. Have Current Employees Meet with Potential Candidates – You as the hiring manager can only provide one perspective of the company. It can be very beneficial for potential hires to meet their future coworkers. It gives you a better idea of if they will be a good cultural fit. It will also allow the candidates to ask some questions they may not have felt comfortable asking you (Is there a good work/life balance, is there flexibility when it comes to parents with young kids, is it a very sales driven/numbers oriented management style, how are the managers there, etc.)
  7. Share benefits and any company incentives before the offer is made. Discuss their expectations of benefits early in the process (what it will cost them? what is offered?) and paid time off (what have they had at previous companies and are they willing to live with what you are offering?) Too often this is not discussed until after the job has been accepted.
  8. Communication is Vital! If you only read one sentence in this article, let it be this one. Stay in constant communication with your potential hires! Communicating potwith them helps keep them engaged and interested in the role. I feel like a broken record saying this, but I’ll say it again in hopes it sticks. The job market is hot right now for candidates and they are seeing multiple job offers left and right. Keeping them interested is probably going to be one of the hardest steps, but necessary if you don’t want to lose them. Consistently communicating with them will help establish a relationship even before they are hired.  It will also help them feel they are heard for what they are looking for and show you’re excited for the possibility of working with them!

Now get to hiring!

P.S. If you need assistance in your employment needs, Godshall is one call away! 😉

 

Written by: Shawn Kinard, Recruiting and Branding Specialist with Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing

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What do you ❤️ about your job?

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It’s very rare to hear people say, “I absolutely love my job.” In fact, I’ve probably only heard it once or twice since entering the workforce. Most of the conversations we have in the recruiting field are talking about how much one hates their job and how they can’t wait to leave. I’d like to put a spin on things for this month of LOVE and share with you the reasons I love my job!

 

I ❤️ MY COWORKERS!

To say I LOVE my coworkers is a complete understatement. I’ve worked with them for over 5 years now and honestly can say I look at them as my family. Our team is set up kind of like a “bull pin” area and it really helps us work more collaboratively and handle stress better when it comes. This group of people really appreciates one another and are always there to help carry the burdens and anxieties of the day. It’s one thing to work with people you love; it’s even better when you work with people who love you/appreciate you back!

I ❤️ MY BOSSES!

Both my manager and the owner of the company have personally invested time and energy into helping me be the best I can be. I’ve experienced managers in the past that only cared about themselves and growing their career. That’s the exact opposite of mine. They have used their time to help me grow and mature into the business person I am today.

I ❤️ WHAT I DO!

Please don’t hate me. I know it’s rare to love your job and I know I’ve been blessed! It took me a long time to get to a point where I truly love my job. If you’ve recently graduated, your first job probably isn’t going to make your heart flutter. Mine didn’t. And my first job was at the same company I’m at now! I started out a receptionist answering phones and greeting candidates. Was it a great job for a new college grad looking to get into the HR field? Of course! Was it my dream job? No. But I was told this position had room to grow and guess what? I grew. It took time and my patience grew 😊, but it was honestly worth it! I do a mix of marketing and HR which is exactly what my degrees were in. It’s challenging, it’s something different every day, and its positively impacting those around us!

Jobs aren’t perfect, and neither is mine. But instead of always focusing on the negative, I’m choosing to focus on the things I love and I’m thankful for. And I’m sure if you looked at yours closely, you could find some things too!

Share below what you ❤️ about your job!

Written by: Shawn Kinard

When Dress Isn’t Your Strongest Suit

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Let me start by admitting that I’m not particularly stylish. In fact, my mom still picks out a lot of my clothes – a fact I realize is moderately embarrassing. But with or without a natural eye for fashion, your wardrobe is much more than just fabric and zippers. It’s an essential component of your personal brand. The tailored suits and dresses Alicia Florrick (Juliana Marguiles) and Jessica Pearson (Gina Torres) don for The Good Wife and Suits are my personal muses. They miraculously exude both power and poise. But, cultivating that kind of closet can be a herculean task without the assistance of stylists and mega-budgets.

Don’t fret, there’s hope for us yet.

The first step in curating a killer wardrobe is deciding who you are and how you want to be perceived. There are no right or wrong answers. Your wardrobe gives people a hint about who you are before you even say a word. As Kanye West posits in Estelle’s American Boy, “Before he speak his suit bespoke.” Ah, the poetry. An easy way to clarify your image is to think of a celebrity you admire and observe their fashion choices. They have a professional doing it for them behind the scenes, so mooch off that a bit. Me? The Chanel and St. John suits from my TV fashion idols don’t really make sense for me or my budget, but the crisp clean lines with architectural details do.

No matter what image you’re portraying, it always looks better when it fits properly. As a six-foot-tall woman, I’m hypersensitive to fit because I can effortlessly channel Oliver Twist in most standard clothing. There are a few things to always check before you buy/wear something. For pants, make sure the length is appropriate for the type of pant and the shoe you’re wearing. (Check out this guide for easy answers and pictures here.) For both skirts and blouses, bend over and see what happens. If anything is compromised, it’s too short or too low-cut. Clothing needs to be moderately functional because even if you love something, you’ll never feel comfortable or confident if you’re exposed. Lastly, turn around. Sometimes it’s what we don’t see that really bites us in the butt…

The final step in dressing like a boss is to actually dress like your boss. More formal clothing changes the way your brain works according to a study in the journal Social Psychological & Personality Science. Researchers found that not only did dressing snazzy improve cognitive thinking, it made people feel better. If “formal” doesn’t align with your brand, pair your graphic tee with some clean sneaks and dark jeans. Same difference.

I know you aren’t supposed to judge a book by its cover, but your clothes tell a story. Make sure it’s the tale you want to be told.

Written by: Hannah Barfield Spellmeyer

Hannah Barfield Spellmeyer  spends her days matching exceptional candidates to their dream jobs at Godshall Professional Recruiting. A writer and speaker, Hannah provides witty and insightful perspectives on talent acquisition, sales, and personal development. She’s always on LinkedIn, so reach out anytime.

You can read more of Hannah’s blogs at https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/hannahbarfield.