What do you ❤️ about your job?

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It’s very rare to hear people say, “I absolutely love my job.” In fact, I’ve probably only heard it once or twice since entering the workforce. Most of the conversations we have in the recruiting field are talking about how much one hates their job and how they can’t wait to leave. I’d like to put a spin on things for this month of LOVE and share with you the reasons I love my job!

 

I ❤️ MY COWORKERS!

To say I LOVE my coworkers is a complete understatement. I’ve worked with them for over 5 years now and honestly can say I look at them as my family. Our team is set up kind of like a “bull pin” area and it really helps us work more collaboratively and handle stress better when it comes. This group of people really appreciates one another and are always there to help carry the burdens and anxieties of the day. It’s one thing to work with people you love; it’s even better when you work with people who love you/appreciate you back!

I ❤️ MY BOSSES!

Both my manager and the owner of the company have personally invested time and energy into helping me be the best I can be. I’ve experienced managers in the past that only cared about themselves and growing their career. That’s the exact opposite of mine. They have used their time to help me grow and mature into the business person I am today.

I ❤️ WHAT I DO!

Please don’t hate me. I know it’s rare to love your job and I know I’ve been blessed! It took me a long time to get to a point where I truly love my job. If you’ve recently graduated, your first job probably isn’t going to make your heart flutter. Mine didn’t. And my first job was at the same company I’m at now! I started out a receptionist answering phones and greeting candidates. Was it a great job for a new college grad looking to get into the HR field? Of course! Was it my dream job? No. But I was told this position had room to grow and guess what? I grew. It took time and my patience grew 😊, but it was honestly worth it! I do a mix of marketing and HR which is exactly what my degrees were in. It’s challenging, it’s something different every day, and its positively impacting those around us!

Jobs aren’t perfect, and neither is mine. But instead of always focusing on the negative, I’m choosing to focus on the things I love and I’m thankful for. And I’m sure if you looked at yours closely, you could find some things too!

Share below what you ❤️ about your job!

Written by: Shawn Kinard

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When Dress Isn’t Your Strongest Suit

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Let me start by admitting that I’m not particularly stylish. In fact, my mom still picks out a lot of my clothes – a fact I realize is moderately embarrassing. But with or without a natural eye for fashion, your wardrobe is much more than just fabric and zippers. It’s an essential component of your personal brand. The tailored suits and dresses Alicia Florrick (Juliana Marguiles) and Jessica Pearson (Gina Torres) don for The Good Wife and Suits are my personal muses. They miraculously exude both power and poise. But, cultivating that kind of closet can be a herculean task without the assistance of stylists and mega-budgets.

Don’t fret, there’s hope for us yet.

The first step in curating a killer wardrobe is deciding who you are and how you want to be perceived. There are no right or wrong answers. Your wardrobe gives people a hint about who you are before you even say a word. As Kanye West posits in Estelle’s American Boy, “Before he speak his suit bespoke.” Ah, the poetry. An easy way to clarify your image is to think of a celebrity you admire and observe their fashion choices. They have a professional doing it for them behind the scenes, so mooch off that a bit. Me? The Chanel and St. John suits from my TV fashion idols don’t really make sense for me or my budget, but the crisp clean lines with architectural details do.

No matter what image you’re portraying, it always looks better when it fits properly. As a six-foot-tall woman, I’m hypersensitive to fit because I can effortlessly channel Oliver Twist in most standard clothing. There are a few things to always check before you buy/wear something. For pants, make sure the length is appropriate for the type of pant and the shoe you’re wearing. (Check out this guide for easy answers and pictures here.) For both skirts and blouses, bend over and see what happens. If anything is compromised, it’s too short or too low-cut. Clothing needs to be moderately functional because even if you love something, you’ll never feel comfortable or confident if you’re exposed. Lastly, turn around. Sometimes it’s what we don’t see that really bites us in the butt…

The final step in dressing like a boss is to actually dress like your boss. More formal clothing changes the way your brain works according to a study in the journal Social Psychological & Personality Science. Researchers found that not only did dressing snazzy improve cognitive thinking, it made people feel better. If “formal” doesn’t align with your brand, pair your graphic tee with some clean sneaks and dark jeans. Same difference.

I know you aren’t supposed to judge a book by its cover, but your clothes tell a story. Make sure it’s the tale you want to be told.

Written by: Hannah Barfield Spellmeyer

Hannah Barfield Spellmeyer  spends her days matching exceptional candidates to their dream jobs at Godshall Professional Recruiting. A writer and speaker, Hannah provides witty and insightful perspectives on talent acquisition, sales, and personal development. She’s always on LinkedIn, so reach out anytime.

You can read more of Hannah’s blogs at https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/hannahbarfield.

4 Practical Tips To Help Master Your Next Phone Interview!

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In a world of job portals and hiring black holes, just getting an interview can feel like an impossible task. I’ve been there. Now that I’ve seen the other side of the curtain, I can disclose in our defense that HR departments and recruiters are parsing through hundreds of resumes on a regular basis. Those are intimidating odds where every interaction counts.

Phone interviews can be used to speak with candidates who are geographically unavailable, but more often than not they are merely the first hurdle in a hiring process. Phone screens allow employers to get a brief look into the personality and skill set a candidate brings to the table without blocking key decision-makers’ schedules, reserving conference rooms, and struggling through an hour-long interview that’s clearly not a fit. Phone interviews also allow employers to evaluate a larger number of candidates before narrowing down the talent pool.

If all goes well, you’ll get an interview with the hiring manager and team. If the phone call is botched, you’ll go back to canvasing LinkedIn and Indeed. Follow the tips below to dial-up success.

  1. Set the scene. A corner booth at a busy Starbucks is no place to have a phone interview. It’s loud. It’s distracting. And your interviewer won’t think you respect their time. Find a quiet place that allows you to hear and be heard.

Eliminate any and all distractions including cell phone notifications, televisions, pets, children, and computers. Some experts recommend keeping a laptop open in case you need to quickly research something. This is a terrible idea. Interviewers can hear you typing and there is no feasible way you can continue a conversation while Googling the answer to the last question.

  1. Talk the talk. During a phone interview, you and the other caller obviously aren’t able to read non-verbal cues. One of the most common mistakes candidates make during phone interviews is demonstrating very poor listening skills. Elaborate on all of your great experience, but make sure you’re leaving enough time for the interviewer to provide insight or follow-up questions.

Don’t forget that we’re relying solely on verbal communication. You must also use proper grammar and pronunciation.

  1. Don’t forget your body language. We can’t see you, but your non-verbal cues do influence how you sound. First, sit up straight. You should not conduct a phone interview on an overstuffed couch or comfy bed. Sitting at a table or desk will prevent you from sounding groggy.

Dress professionally. If you’re wearing your jammies, you’re definitely not going to feel confident and prepared.

Most importantly, smile. It changes the inflection in your voice and interviewers can hear the difference.

  1. Use a cheat sheet. Your interviewer can hear you typing on a laptop, but we surely cannot discern your pencil jotting notes. Have your resume and a blank sheet of paper available in order to take notes and write down questions along the way.

 

A phone interview is not the time to be nonchalant about your preparation. It can be even more difficult to impress someone without shaking their hand and looking them in the eye. Take a little effort with the suggestions above and you’ll have no problem standing out from the crowd – in a good way.

 

Written by: Hannah Spellmeyer

 

 

Managing Millennials & Moving On

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We’re inundated on a daily basis with content on millennials – a pervasive, complex, and reviled group of workers. So, I’ve been brainstorming about a key takeaway and what I could possibly say at this point that’s novel. I landed on a simple call to action: move on.

Here’s the deal: with the oldest millennials being about 36 years old, we finally have some definitive research on their workplace behaviors and can compare them to previous generations. Here’s the summary: there is little to no difference in levels of narcissism, job tenure, or work ethic amongst millennials and previous generations in their twenties. It turns out, all youth is narcissistic, indecisive, and distracted.

Okay, okay. You need evidence. After all, I’m a millennial – why trust me?

Most of the studies you see compare millennials to the current feelings and behaviors of Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers. A study cited in Business Insider just this week provides a perfect example. “Daymon Worldwide notes that millennials are more obsessed with being unique and standing out than their parents and grandparents are.” (http://www.businessinsider.com/differences-between-boomers-gen-x-and-millennials-2016-6) I hope they didn’t spend a lot of money on that research because if I compare any 25 year old and their 75 year old Nana, I would certainly hope their level of maturity and narcissism differed.

In regards to the job-hopping, Baby Boomer’s actually changed jobs in their twenties at the same rate that millennials do now (http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/nlsoy.pdf)! Let me demystify this: young people usually take whatever job they can get starting off. They don’t know what they want to do long-term and millennials came of age during a recession where if you didn’t take whatever job you could get, you were perpetually unemployed. (Unemployed = no brunch. Millennials love brunch).

Lastly, millennials work differently but they are not aggregately lazy. Lazy is a really loaded word and I don’t have the space to enumerate the dangers of characterizing an entire group as something derogatory, so use your own intuition here. Every time you’re tempted to say “lazy”, replace it with “different.” Because the truth is millennials are very different from previous generations in their beliefs about work. We don’t always subscribe to traditional hours. We value work-life balance and sometimes prioritize it over a demanding career. We want to understand the why’s behind what we’re doing because we need purpose. Are these good qualities? Bad? Admirable? I don’t know exactly, but aren’t all those statements what people tell us to prioritize after it’s too late for them to change? Spend more time with your family. Do something you love. Work hard, but set boundaries.

On the upside, you’ll also find that we answer late-night emails. Because we grew up with technology, we constantly look for ways to be more efficient. When we find our passion, we’ll work however many hours it takes. The key for employers is to harness that passion and not let vintage expectations drive away a talented workforce.

So, that’s it. There’s your answer. Young people are needy and kind of difficult to work with and they always will be. Maybe in a few years I’ll be blogging on the pains of Gen Zer’s. Que sera, tale as old as time. Let’s stop dwelling it on it now.

Written by: Hannah Barfield Spellmeyer