Help Us Help You!

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Most candidates coming to a recruiting firm are looking for help in finding a new job. But little do they know, candidates can be their own worst enemy. Below are some very simple suggestions candidates can do to help their recruiters help themselves in their job search.

  1. Answer your phone. We see too many situations where we’ve called a candidate, left a voicemail, and the call isn’t returned for several days. That isn’t helpful for anyone. Job seekers are called all the time for several different reaspic 1ons: to run a position by them, to set up an interview, to discuss an offer, etc. But when candidates don’t answer the phone, you are not only slowing down your job search, but you’re potentially pushing a recruiter to move on to the next candidate.
  2. Check your voicemail. If in the event you are unable to get to your phone, a voicemail is typically left with the purpose of the phone call. It is very helpful if you check the voicemail before calling back to save you time and your recruiter’s time. Not checking your voicemail first before calling back displays unprofessionalism.
  3. Make sure your voicemail isn’t full. If I had a nickel for every time I’ve called a candidate and their voicemail box is full, I wouldn’t need to work anymore. A best practice would be once you’ve listened to the voicemail, delete it from your phone to make room for future ones!
  4. Take assessments you’re given as soon as possible. When you are looking for a job, it can be hard to find time to work in all the things required for a job search. Assessments are given for all kind of reasons the main one being to help us see if pic 2you’re a fit for a role. If you take 3 days to follow through, what does that say about you? It certainly doesn’t scream you’re excited for this opportunity. The longer you take in finishing the assessments, the longer it will be before you find a new job.
  5. Update your resume with suggested changes in a timely manner. Most recruiters have been in the hiring industry long enough to know the best tips on writing a successful resume. If you’re given suggestions to improve your resume, do your best to get those changes corrected and sent back to us as soon as possible.
  6. Let recruiters know of any changes in your job search. If you get a raise in your current job, need more benefits now, need part time vs. full time now, let your recruiter know as soon as you can. Don’t wait until after we’ve sent your resume to a company or you’ve interviewed to update us on your changes. It is a waste of time for both parties.
  7. Follow up with your recruiter after interviews. pic 3If you loved your interview and love the job, let us know. If you learned things about the job that makes you no longer interested, let us know. We want to know your feedback to better serve you and our client. The faster we receive feedback, the faster we can be in finding the perfect fit for you!

We certainly know how hard finding a new job can be. But with these tips, your job search can be easier and smoother for both you and your recruiter!

Written by: Shawn Kinard

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👻 BOO! Hiring Can Be Scary! 👻

Bringing someone new into your organization can be not only a time-consuming task, but a stressful and scary one too. What if they aren’t good at their job? What if they don’t get along with the other employees? What if our customers don’t like them? While I wouldn’t call Godshall a fortune teller, being in the business for 50 years has provided us the experience needed to learn the necessary steps your company should take to make the best hire possible.

  1. Define the Role Before Starting the Search – If you don’t know what you need, books2.PNGhow are you going to know what to look for? Defining the role will help you define the duties, responsibilities, and skills needed for the job. Are there any technical or software skills needed? What about soft skills? Will they be on the phone a lot and need a professional and personable attitude?
  2. Utilize Behavioral Interviewing Techniques – Behavioral questions are the best in helping you determine real-life work experiences. Have the candidate describe an actual work situation. Have them describe the situation, their role, and the result. How did they feel about their supervisors, coworkers, and subordinates during the process? Were they a hindrance or a help in solving the problem?
  3. web.PNGUnderstanding Interviewing Is Only One Step of The Screening Process – Many companies these days, including Godshall, are using skills tests, profile assessments, and other resources in their hiring process. These tests allow the hiring managers to receive insight into a candidate’s natural strengths, and help your business leaders make more informed and objective decisions on hiring.
  4. The Past Typically Predicts the Future – It sounds cliché, but reference checks are so important in the hiring process. Understanding how your potential candidate has performed in the past, where he/she was most successful, how they got along with others, and their reasons for leaving are crucial! If your candidate left for more money every year, chances are they’re going to leave you in a year for more money. Don’t be afraid to ask the references real life questions ie- How do they deal with conflict?  How do they make tough decisions?  What type of work environment do they need to succeed?  What advice would you give their new supervisor? Ask whatever you need to know (and legally allowed 😊) to help make the best hire.
  5. Consider Checking Out Social Media Profiles – Social media provides a different ghostperspective on the candidate and helps give you an idea of their character and lifestyle. Many profiles are private these days, but it doesn’t hurt to double check. LinkedIn is a great account to check out for several reasons. It allows you to make sure their history on their profile matches up with their resume. It can also give you an idea of their network especially if they are going into a high sales driven/networking role. As a hiring manager, you must be careful from what you learn on social media and what could steer your hiring decision from that. We hope all of you are non-discriminatory give consideration for employment to qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, status as a parent or protected veteran status.
  6. Have Current Employees Meet with Potential Candidates – You as the hiring manager can only provide one perspective of the company. It can be very beneficial for potential hires to meet their future coworkers. It gives you a better idea of if they will be a good cultural fit. It will also allow the candidates to ask some questions they may not have felt comfortable asking you (Is there a good work/life balance, is there flexibility when it comes to parents with young kids, is it a very sales driven/numbers oriented management style, how are the managers there, etc.)
  7. Share benefits and any company incentives before the offer is made. Discuss their expectations of benefits early in the process (what it will cost them? what is offered?) and paid time off (what have they had at previous companies and are they willing to live with what you are offering?) Too often this is not discussed until after the job has been accepted.
  8. Communication is Vital! If you only read one sentence in this article, let it be this one. Stay in constant communication with your potential hires! Communicating potwith them helps keep them engaged and interested in the role. I feel like a broken record saying this, but I’ll say it again in hopes it sticks. The job market is hot right now for candidates and they are seeing multiple job offers left and right. Keeping them interested is probably going to be one of the hardest steps, but necessary if you don’t want to lose them. Consistently communicating with them will help establish a relationship even before they are hired.  It will also help them feel they are heard for what they are looking for and show you’re excited for the possibility of working with them!

Now get to hiring!

P.S. If you need assistance in your employment needs, Godshall is one call away! 😉

 

Written by: Shawn Kinard, Recruiting and Branding Specialist with Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing

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What do you ❤️ about your job?

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It’s very rare to hear people say, “I absolutely love my job.” In fact, I’ve probably only heard it once or twice since entering the workforce. Most of the conversations we have in the recruiting field are talking about how much one hates their job and how they can’t wait to leave. I’d like to put a spin on things for this month of LOVE and share with you the reasons I love my job!

 

I ❤️ MY COWORKERS!

To say I LOVE my coworkers is a complete understatement. I’ve worked with them for over 5 years now and honestly can say I look at them as my family. Our team is set up kind of like a “bull pin” area and it really helps us work more collaboratively and handle stress better when it comes. This group of people really appreciates one another and are always there to help carry the burdens and anxieties of the day. It’s one thing to work with people you love; it’s even better when you work with people who love you/appreciate you back!

I ❤️ MY BOSSES!

Both my manager and the owner of the company have personally invested time and energy into helping me be the best I can be. I’ve experienced managers in the past that only cared about themselves and growing their career. That’s the exact opposite of mine. They have used their time to help me grow and mature into the business person I am today.

I ❤️ WHAT I DO!

Please don’t hate me. I know it’s rare to love your job and I know I’ve been blessed! It took me a long time to get to a point where I truly love my job. If you’ve recently graduated, your first job probably isn’t going to make your heart flutter. Mine didn’t. And my first job was at the same company I’m at now! I started out a receptionist answering phones and greeting candidates. Was it a great job for a new college grad looking to get into the HR field? Of course! Was it my dream job? No. But I was told this position had room to grow and guess what? I grew. It took time and my patience grew 😊, but it was honestly worth it! I do a mix of marketing and HR which is exactly what my degrees were in. It’s challenging, it’s something different every day, and its positively impacting those around us!

Jobs aren’t perfect, and neither is mine. But instead of always focusing on the negative, I’m choosing to focus on the things I love and I’m thankful for. And I’m sure if you looked at yours closely, you could find some things too!

Share below what you ❤️ about your job!

Written by: Shawn Kinard

🎄It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like I Need a New Job!🎄

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Contemplating a new job can leave you anxious and disheartened. It’s not something I think any of us are excited to do. It’s time consuming and a little intimidating; however, it is sometimes a must. If you’re wondering whether you’re in that boat or not, here are some key signs you need to start updating that resume:

  1. You’re getting passed over for promotions by less qualified peers. Now if you’re that millennial thinking you need to be promoted to manager after only being there for 6 months, slow your roll. I’m talking about promotions that you are qualified for and deserving of. If you’ve asked to be considered for promotions that you know are a logical progression of your skills and abilities but they keep passing over you, it might be time to start looking elsewhere. Especially if they never give you a true reason as to why they won’t consider you. A healthy and blossoming work environment will see your value, your hard work, and find joy in promoting you to a well-deserved role.
  2. You haven’t been given a raise or merit increase in over 18 months. This kind of falls into  the same philosophy as above. Many companies give at least a 3% raise annually to match inflation and honor your loyalty. Managers can see the hard work you’re making for the company. If you’re not receiving at least a cost of living increase, you need to start questioning whether you are part of a company that will allow you to grow professionally and financially. A healthy work environment and management team will recognize your hard work and want to reward you for it.
  3. Your company is hanging by a thread. One of the reasons you might not be receiving those annual increases could be because the company can’t afford it! If you’re being called by your vendors continuously for unpaid invoices, that’s a bad sign.
  4. Turnover is high. Do you have a new co-worker every 6 months? Is your manager doing anything to stop the bleeding? Unfortunately, high turnover is a reflection on company’s management and it’s not a pretty one. If this is the case where you work, it’s time to start looking.
  5. You notice the company is downsizing. Downsizing can happen for numerous reasons in a company: poor economic conditions, cost reduction, consolidation, outsourcing, etc. This doesn’t necessarily mean you are going to be included in layoffs, but it’s definitely a good idea to start updating your resume just in case.
  6. You’re being asked to do unethical tasks. This one is an obvious sign. You never want to be asked to do things that go against your moral values or put you in risk of breaking the law.
  7. You’re thinking about your lunch break before you even go into work. Do you dread Sunday nights and look forward to Friday at 5 every single week? As a millennial myself, I feel like I must call out my peers and mention it does take a while to find what you’re passionate about  and what you truly enjoy in life. Your first job out of college is not going to be your dream job. And you might not enjoy every second of every day you’re at work. That’s just a part of life.  That being said, if you’ve been at your company for at least a year and you dread work every single day, it’s time to turn on those alerts on the job boards.

Looking for a new job can be frightening, but sometimes necessary for the well-being of you and your career. If you have any other signs I didn’t mention, share them below! 

Shawn 2016 croppedWritten by: Shawn Kinard

Shawn is the Recruiting and Branding Specialist at Godshall. She has been at Godshall for over 5 years now. She graduated from Anderson University with a Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management. She enjoys biking on the Swamp Rabbit Trail, hot yoga, and trying new recipes when she’s not in the office.