Help Us Help You!

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Most candidates coming to a recruiting firm are looking for help in finding a new job. But little do they know, candidates can be their own worst enemy. Below are some very simple suggestions candidates can do to help their recruiters help themselves in their job search.

  1. Answer your phone. We see too many situations where we’ve called a candidate, left a voicemail, and the call isn’t returned for several days. That isn’t helpful for anyone. Job seekers are called all the time for several different reaspic 1ons: to run a position by them, to set up an interview, to discuss an offer, etc. But when candidates don’t answer the phone, you are not only slowing down your job search, but you’re potentially pushing a recruiter to move on to the next candidate.
  2. Check your voicemail. If in the event you are unable to get to your phone, a voicemail is typically left with the purpose of the phone call. It is very helpful if you check the voicemail before calling back to save you time and your recruiter’s time. Not checking your voicemail first before calling back displays unprofessionalism.
  3. Make sure your voicemail isn’t full. If I had a nickel for every time I’ve called a candidate and their voicemail box is full, I wouldn’t need to work anymore. A best practice would be once you’ve listened to the voicemail, delete it from your phone to make room for future ones!
  4. Take assessments you’re given as soon as possible. When you are looking for a job, it can be hard to find time to work in all the things required for a job search. Assessments are given for all kind of reasons the main one being to help us see if pic 2you’re a fit for a role. If you take 3 days to follow through, what does that say about you? It certainly doesn’t scream you’re excited for this opportunity. The longer you take in finishing the assessments, the longer it will be before you find a new job.
  5. Update your resume with suggested changes in a timely manner. Most recruiters have been in the hiring industry long enough to know the best tips on writing a successful resume. If you’re given suggestions to improve your resume, do your best to get those changes corrected and sent back to us as soon as possible.
  6. Let recruiters know of any changes in your job search. If you get a raise in your current job, need more benefits now, need part time vs. full time now, let your recruiter know as soon as you can. Don’t wait until after we’ve sent your resume to a company or you’ve interviewed to update us on your changes. It is a waste of time for both parties.
  7. Follow up with your recruiter after interviews. pic 3If you loved your interview and love the job, let us know. If you learned things about the job that makes you no longer interested, let us know. We want to know your feedback to better serve you and our client. The faster we receive feedback, the faster we can be in finding the perfect fit for you!

We certainly know how hard finding a new job can be. But with these tips, your job search can be easier and smoother for both you and your recruiter!

Written by: Shawn Kinard

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Prepping is a Must!

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Have you ever finished an exam and known immediately you got an A? It’s one of the best feelings. While I can’t promise you an A on your next interview, I can promise you will go in feeling more prepared than ever before! I’ve been at Godshall for over 6 years now and work with some of the most trusted experts in the field of hiring. We have come up with some of our best tips to prepare for your next interview. After reading these tips, you’ll be an expert too!

  1. Researching, i.e., Stalking.Let’s be honest, we’ve all surprised ourselves at how good we are at stalking. Thanks to social media, you now can uncover a person’s entire life story without even knowing their last name. So why not put those stalking skills to good use? Your goal is to go in feeling like you already work there! Make sure to research the following:
    • The company:
      1. How long have they been around?
      2. What is their mission?
      3. How many employees do they have?
      4. Who are their competitors?
      5. What do they do?
      6. Have they been in the news recently?
    • The interviewers:
      1. What is their job title?
      2. Check them out on LinkedIn and other social media outlets to see what they’re like, how long they’ve been in that role, and any other interesting info.
      3. Google them to see if they are in the news.
  1. Study the Job Description. Sometimes companies do not provide the most detailed job description. When they do, make sure you truly understand the job and what you will be doing. Nothing says a lack of detail and understanding quite like telling an interviewer you’re not much of a desk person when you’re interviewing for an accounting position. #notwinning  Also, compare your previous experience with this new role so when they ask why they should hire you, you’ve got the hard facts.
  2. Practice makes perfect. If you have not interviewed in a while, it would be in your best interest to practice answering some of the traditional interview questions (Tell me about yourself, strengths vs. weaknesses, why you are looking, etc.) You want to present yourself as a calm and poised professional. Practicing will help relieve some of those pre-interview jitters and will help you come across more confident as well.
  3. Dress the part. The company and market will determine what you should wear. For about 90% of interviews, traditional business attire is acceptable. When you’re interviewing for marketing agencies or young startup companies, you might be able to branch out a little and show your creativity. Once you have your outfit picked out, put it on a few days before. Have someone else critique it to make sure it all looks good. Make sure everything is spotless and perfectly ironed.  Also, it’s a good idea to plan a back-up outfit in case your coffee decides to go crazy. Your goal is to leave your home feeling confident and on point from head to toe.
  4. Know where you’re going ahead of time. Thanks to Google Maps, you can now see an overhead and street view of the company. Once you have an idea of what the building looks like, find directions from your home to the company. You might even want to print or screenshot those directions just in case. Finally, drive that exact route to make sure there aren’t any road closings, heavy traffic areas, or anything else that might delay your commute the day before (Waze is a great app to show current wrecks, heavy traffic areas, road closings, etc.). Showing up late for an interview is not professional.
  5. Remember, they’re not JUST a receptionist. That receptionist may very well be your ticket into or out of the company. Treat everyone with the same respect whether they are the administrative assistant or the CEO. How you treat people when no one else is looking says a lot about your character and how you will truly act if you get the job.
  6. Bring several copies of your resume and references. Having extra copies helps you looked prepared and organized. In some cases, the hiring manager might’ve lost yours and needs a new one. In other cases, other employees might be pulled into the interview and would like to see a copy as well.

Now go ace that interview!

Written by: Shawn Kinard

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👻 BOO! Hiring Can Be Scary! 👻

Bringing someone new into your organization can be not only a time-consuming task, but a stressful and scary one too. What if they aren’t good at their job? What if they don’t get along with the other employees? What if our customers don’t like them? While I wouldn’t call Godshall a fortune teller, being in the business for 50 years has provided us the experience needed to learn the necessary steps your company should take to make the best hire possible.

  1. Define the Role Before Starting the Search – If you don’t know what you need, books2.PNGhow are you going to know what to look for? Defining the role will help you define the duties, responsibilities, and skills needed for the job. Are there any technical or software skills needed? What about soft skills? Will they be on the phone a lot and need a professional and personable attitude?
  2. Utilize Behavioral Interviewing Techniques – Behavioral questions are the best in helping you determine real-life work experiences. Have the candidate describe an actual work situation. Have them describe the situation, their role, and the result. How did they feel about their supervisors, coworkers, and subordinates during the process? Were they a hindrance or a help in solving the problem?
  3. web.PNGUnderstanding Interviewing Is Only One Step of The Screening Process – Many companies these days, including Godshall, are using skills tests, profile assessments, and other resources in their hiring process. These tests allow the hiring managers to receive insight into a candidate’s natural strengths, and help your business leaders make more informed and objective decisions on hiring.
  4. The Past Typically Predicts the Future – It sounds cliché, but reference checks are so important in the hiring process. Understanding how your potential candidate has performed in the past, where he/she was most successful, how they got along with others, and their reasons for leaving are crucial! If your candidate left for more money every year, chances are they’re going to leave you in a year for more money. Don’t be afraid to ask the references real life questions ie- How do they deal with conflict?  How do they make tough decisions?  What type of work environment do they need to succeed?  What advice would you give their new supervisor? Ask whatever you need to know (and legally allowed 😊) to help make the best hire.
  5. Consider Checking Out Social Media Profiles – Social media provides a different ghostperspective on the candidate and helps give you an idea of their character and lifestyle. Many profiles are private these days, but it doesn’t hurt to double check. LinkedIn is a great account to check out for several reasons. It allows you to make sure their history on their profile matches up with their resume. It can also give you an idea of their network especially if they are going into a high sales driven/networking role. As a hiring manager, you must be careful from what you learn on social media and what could steer your hiring decision from that. We hope all of you are non-discriminatory give consideration for employment to qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, status as a parent or protected veteran status.
  6. Have Current Employees Meet with Potential Candidates – You as the hiring manager can only provide one perspective of the company. It can be very beneficial for potential hires to meet their future coworkers. It gives you a better idea of if they will be a good cultural fit. It will also allow the candidates to ask some questions they may not have felt comfortable asking you (Is there a good work/life balance, is there flexibility when it comes to parents with young kids, is it a very sales driven/numbers oriented management style, how are the managers there, etc.)
  7. Share benefits and any company incentives before the offer is made. Discuss their expectations of benefits early in the process (what it will cost them? what is offered?) and paid time off (what have they had at previous companies and are they willing to live with what you are offering?) Too often this is not discussed until after the job has been accepted.
  8. Communication is Vital! If you only read one sentence in this article, let it be this one. Stay in constant communication with your potential hires! Communicating potwith them helps keep them engaged and interested in the role. I feel like a broken record saying this, but I’ll say it again in hopes it sticks. The job market is hot right now for candidates and they are seeing multiple job offers left and right. Keeping them interested is probably going to be one of the hardest steps, but necessary if you don’t want to lose them. Consistently communicating with them will help establish a relationship even before they are hired.  It will also help them feel they are heard for what they are looking for and show you’re excited for the possibility of working with them!

Now get to hiring!

P.S. If you need assistance in your employment needs, Godshall is one call away! 😉

 

Written by: Shawn Kinard, Recruiting and Branding Specialist with Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing

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How to Help Newly Hired Employees Hit the Ground Running!

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You’ve put an incredible amount of effort into hiring the right match for your position, your offer was accepted, and now you’re anxious to see the results.  Your work is done, right?  Not quite!  A few easy tips for helping your newly hired employee get off to the right start:

  1. Give them a warm welcome! Whether or not you provide a formal orientation, introduce them around so that coworkers will know who they are and where they are working. Allow some time for interaction via the water cooler or a personal introduction.  Give them information about customs that may be unique to your firm.  Have someone take them out to lunch the first day if possible.

2. Make sure the newly hired employee feels you are ready for them. Are business cards in? Is their computer and desk set up? Do they have office supplies?  Little things matter.

3. Be wise in choosing the trainer. Like most small businesses, if you don’t have a formal training program, be cautious not to assume that the employee with the most expertise is also the best trainer. Often, you will want to involve multiple people in the process so that the newly hired employee understands how their role fits into the organization.  For example, sales professionals should spend time with customer service or technical support professionals so that they understand the customer.  Also, be aware that people have different learning styles—some need to “do” rather than just hear or see.

4. Set clear expectations. This is your chance to start with a clean slate.  Let the new hire know what is expected of them and how they will be measured.  Let them know how often you will meet with them and how to have questions answered.

5. Put their success in the hands of the entire team. When the team feels it is in their best interest for a newly hired employee to be successful, they are more likely to support them and give the newly hired employee the best possible chance for success.

Do you have any other tips for starting new employees?

 

Written by: Julie Godshall Brown

Julie is the president and owner of Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing. She has been with her family business full time since 1995 and remained as president and owner when her parents retired in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Clemson University and a Master of Personnel and Employee Relations from the University of South Carolina. In addition to leading her firm and several industry related organizations, she is a very active community volunteer who has made an impact on the future of the Upstate.