How to Help Newly Hired Employees Hit the Ground Running!

461551-12721

 

You’ve put an incredible amount of effort into hiring the right match for your position, your offer was accepted, and now you’re anxious to see the results.  Your work is done, right?  Not quite!  A few easy tips for helping your newly hired employee get off to the right start:

  1. Give them a warm welcome! Whether or not you provide a formal orientation, introduce them around so that coworkers will know who they are and where they are working. Allow some time for interaction via the water cooler or a personal introduction.  Give them information about customs that may be unique to your firm.  Have someone take them out to lunch the first day if possible.

2. Make sure the newly hired employee feels you are ready for them. Are business cards in? Is their computer and desk set up? Do they have office supplies?  Little things matter.

3. Be wise in choosing the trainer. Like most small businesses, if you don’t have a formal training program, be cautious not to assume that the employee with the most expertise is also the best trainer. Often, you will want to involve multiple people in the process so that the newly hired employee understands how their role fits into the organization.  For example, sales professionals should spend time with customer service or technical support professionals so that they understand the customer.  Also, be aware that people have different learning styles—some need to “do” rather than just hear or see.

4. Set clear expectations. This is your chance to start with a clean slate.  Let the new hire know what is expected of them and how they will be measured.  Let them know how often you will meet with them and how to have questions answered.

5. Put their success in the hands of the entire team. When the team feels it is in their best interest for a newly hired employee to be successful, they are more likely to support them and give the newly hired employee the best possible chance for success.

Do you have any other tips for starting new employees?

 

Written by: Julie Godshall Brown

Julie is the president and owner of Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing. She has been with her family business full time since 1995 and remained as president and owner when her parents retired in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Clemson University and a Master of Personnel and Employee Relations from the University of South Carolina. In addition to leading her firm and several industry related organizations, she is a very active community volunteer who has made an impact on the future of the Upstate.

Advertisements

TRUST: How can both sides ensure success from offer to start date?

shaking hands.PNG

The hiring market is very strong not only in the Upstate but across the country. Talent placements are made or lost quickly due to the fast pace required to onboard top talent. One key component in the hiring process creates the foundation for a successful employment relationship: trust.

Mutual trust begins with the first interaction.

Company: Is this candidate whom he says he is? Does he provide requested information promptly and accurately? Can we trust his intentions?

Candidate: Is this company what it says it is? Does it set expectations in the hiring process that it meets or exceeds? Can I trust it enough to share my strengths, weaknesses, and career goals?

Trust builders

  • Timely responses by both the company and the candidate.
  • Clearly defined steps and transparency in the hiring process.
  • Honest information-sharing regarding experience, goals, and finances.
  • An opportunity to meet with current employees, if appropriate.

Trust killers

  • A lengthy and unclear hiring process.
  • A lack of response or followup on either side.
  • One-sided discussions focused on “what can you do for me?”
  • Sharing inconsistent information during the process.

Due to a strong economy and tight labor market, candidates have more opportunities than ever. Many feel that they have to stay on the market to secure their futures. We often see candidates accepting offers but continuing to interview. As a hiring manager, your goal is not only to attract top talent, but to create a relationship of trust.

Employers should consider their responsibilities to candidates who are making major life decisions. Candidates need to remember that giving their word should mean something. Be trustworthy and follow through once you’ve accepted a position. Your reputation is everything.

By: Julie Godshall Brown